September fashion books

A number of interesting books addressing hair and beauty will be published in the coming months. Journalist Sali Hughes follows her successful Pretty Honest book with Pretty Iconic that looks at beauty products that changed the world. Celebrated fashion hair stylist Sam McKnight has compiled a book of photographs that illustrate his handiwork to coincide an exhibitions opening in the Somerset House in October. Styling Masculinity takes an academic look on male grooming.  


Pretty Iconic: A Personal Look at the Beauty Products that Changed the World by Sali Hughes
published in October 2016

Packed full of beauty wisdom, Pretty Iconic takes us from the evocative smell of Johnson’s baby lotion through to Simple Face wipes, NARS Orgasm and beyond, looking at the formative role beauty plays in our lives.

Considering which much-hyped beauty buys are worth the buzz, and who they might be best suited for, in Pretty Iconic Sali Hughes uses her witty, inclusive and discerning style to look at some of the most significant products in beauty from treasured classics such as Chanel No 5, to life-changers such as Babyliss Big Hair, and the more recent releases from Charlotte Tilbury, Sunday Riley and others that are shaping the beauty industry today.

Delving into the products that are simply the best at what they do, the inventions that changed our perception of beauty and the launches that completely broke the mould, Pretty Iconic is a treasure trove of knowledge from Britain’s most trusted beauty writer.

Published by Harper Collins




Hair by Sam McKnight by Sam McKnight
published in October 2016

A bounty of hairstyles, from nostalgic to androgynous, that have transformed women throughout the past forty years, from the legendary Sam McKnight, one of fashion’s leading hairstylists.

With photographs spanning Sam McKnight’s entire career, this book is a dramatic anthology of looks—from retro to androgynous, romantic to sexy, red to platinum—all from the master hairstylist’s deft hand. Featured are some of the most iconic images in popular culture—Princess Diana’s short, slicked-back style, Madonna’s Bedtime Stories cover, Tilda Swinton channeling David Bowie, both Lady Gaga and her male alter-ego, Jo Calderone, plus countless editorial stories featuring the ultimate model for everywoman, Kate Moss, in myriad demonstrations of hairstyles.

McKnight has won numerous awards and has worked with some of the top names in fashion—Patrick Demarchelier, Nick Knight, and Mario Testino to name just a few. From ingenues to tomboys, from the girl next door to the Hollywood siren, the book is organized by theme and includes McKnight’s informative commentary throughout.

Richly illustrated, it features photographs by leading fashion photographers and styles commissioned by Vivienne Westwood, Balmain, Chanel, and many others. A unique reference book that is at once a glamorous look through the past forty years of some of fashion’s most memorable looks and a style bible for glorious locks.

Published by Rizzoli




Styling Masculinity – Gender, Class, and Inequality in the Men’s Grooming Industry by Kristen Barber
published in September 2016

The twenty-first century has seen the emergence of a new style of man: the metrosexual. Overwhelmingly straight, white, and wealthy, these impeccably coiffed urban professionals spend big money on everything from facials to pedicures, all part of a multi-billion-dollar male grooming industry. Yet as this innovative study reveals, even as the industry encourages men to invest more in their appearance, it still relies on women to do much of the work.

Styling Masculinity investigates how men’s beauty salons have persuaded their clientele to regard them as masculine spaces. To answer this question, sociologist Kristen Barber goes inside Adonis and The Executive, two upscale men’s salons in Southern California. Conducting detailed observations and extensive interviews with both customers and employees, she shows how female salon workers not only perform the physical labor of snipping, tweezing, waxing, and exfoliating, but also perform the emotional labor of pampering their clients and pumping up their masculine egos.

Letting salon employees tell their own stories, Barber not only documents occasions when these workers are objectified and demeaned, but also explores how their jobs allow for creativity and confer a degree of professional dignity. In the process, she traces the vast network of economic and social relations that undergird the burgeoning male beauty industry.

Published by Rutgers University Press


Related Post